Berenice Marlohe is Turned on by Craig Ferguson’s Accent

Clustering Your Star Talent

Source: HBR, Jan 2017

What steps should organizations take to make the most of their star talent? Our research highlights five best practices:

Know who the stars are in your organization.

It is difficult to deploy scarce talent effectively without first identifying your company’s A players. Most companies employ some form of assessment based on performance and potential, typically as a vehicle for determining compensation and career progression. Following this approach, A players are employees who score highly on both dimensions.

Know where your A players are (and could be) deployed.

Knowing who your stars are is just the beginning. You also need to know how effectively they are being deployed. For each star in you company, ask two important and related questions:

Where are they currently deployed?

What role is each star currently playing in the organization? This information will help you assess how effectively you are deploying scarce star talent.How fungible are they? Could they perform some other role with the same (or similar) performance? Your most valuable people are both highly proficient in their current roles and highly versatile. If you find that you have underinvested scarce talent in a number of critical roles, versatile stars can help to fill these roles.

Identify the business-critical roles in your company.

Not all roles are created equal. Some are inherently more important than others in successfully executing a company’s strategy and delivering superior performance. The best companies identify these roles explicitly. They ask themselves: “Which roles benefit the most from star talent?” and, by implication, “Which roles can we afford to fill with ‘good enough’ talent?” Having the best software programmer in the world makes little difference if your business is consumer packaged goods. But having the very best brand managers and marketers may make a big difference. The best-performing companies put their talent where the money is.

Treat star talent as a company-wide resource.

Organizations commonly struggle with moving great talent from one part of the company to another. Your star talent can quickly become the property of a single business unit or function unless you have the processes and practices to ensure that these scarce resources are invested on behalf of your entire company, not just the division, business, geography, or function where they currently reside. Organizations that put these practices in place make better use of their existing talent and avoid the artificial shortages of talent that can be created by parochial hoarding of A players.

Ensure that business-critical roles get first dibs on star talent. Once your leadership has the information it needs to determine who and where the stars are in your organization, it must be ruthlessly nonegalitarian in the way it assigns talent. It must make sure that business-critical roles are filled with A players first, and then turn its attention to roles that are important but less business-critical. Only then can you be assured that your star talent is being deployed as well as possible.

Ever since the start of the “war for talent,” companies have invested billions to attract, develop, and retain the very best. Now that war looks like a stalemate: Most companies, on average, have the same amount of stars. The companies that perform the best are the ones that treat star talent as the scarce, hard-won resource that it is.

Norah Jones – Sunrise

Machines (AI) Can Do 25% of CEO Tasks

Source: HBR, Feb 2017

half of the activities people are paid to do in the global economy have the potential to be automated using current technology. The most automatable activities involve data collection, data processing, and physical work in predictable environments like factories, which make up 51% of employment activities (not jobs) and $2.7 trillion of wages in the U.S. These activities are most prevalent in sectors such as manufacturing, food services, transportation and warehousing, and retail.

More occupations will change than will be automated in the short to medium term. Only a small proportion of all occupations (about 5%) can be entirely automated using these demonstrated technologies over the coming decade, though the proportion is likely to be higher in middle-skill job categories.

But we found that about 30% of the activities in 60% of all occupations could be automated — and that will affect everyone from welders to landscape gardeners to mortgage brokers to CEOs. We estimate that about 25% of CEOs’ time is currently spent on activities that machines could do, such as analyzing reports and data to inform decisions.

Like President Johnson in the 1960s, we see that automation could make a major contribution to productivity and prosperity. Our research suggests that future automation could raise productivity growth globally from 0.8%–1.4% annually, which can make a meaningful contribution to global economic growth and compensate for the demographic headwinds of aging populations. For companies around the world, automation will offer the potential to capture

Sex on the 1st Date

Source:  USA Today, Feb 2017

While the rule of thumb may have been wait to have sex until a third date, 34% of singles have had sex before a first date, and Millennials are 48% more likely to have sex before a first date than all other generations of singles, according to the annual Singles in America survey, funded by Dallas-based dating service Match and conducted by Research Now.

“We have a real misunderstanding of Millennials,” she said. “I think they are very career oriented, so sex before the first date could be a sex interview, where they want to know if they want to spend time with this person.”

While 71% of men find it attractive when a woman offers to split the bill, if a woman asks to split it may mean she’s just not that into you.

Sixty-five percent of men reported that they thought a woman offered to split in order to be polite, while 78% of women surveyed said they offered to pay because they don’t want to feel obligated for anything. That means no hug, kiss or second date.

So what does paying for a bill have to do with sex? Women on some level may still believe they are in debt to the man if they take his offering of food, says Eric Marlowe Garrison, a certified sex counselor and assistant director of Office of Health Promotion at William and Mary. 

single men and women can agree on something: The desire for more adventure in the bedroom.

Three in four single men and 64% of single women reported that they want more adventure in the bedroom.

And that may not be too hard to achieve. Anderson says many times the key to good sex is just getting into it.

“Virtually all men report that having an enthusiastic partner is a turn on and that being with a woman who is not embarrassed or shy about her body or her pleasure, but someone who owns their sexuality and celebrates it that is a huge turn,” she says. “It’s not necessarily about being in charge.”

Rogue One Leading into A New Hope

Ghost in the Shell (5 minute trailer)