Category Archives: Career

Starting First Jobs

Source: Fast Company, May 2017

BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS TAKES WORK

ASKING QUESTIONS IS NOT A SIGN OF WEAKNESS

often the smartest move you can make in a new job is to ask a question. After all, there are only two options when faced with a situation that overwhelms or confuses you, as Huhman points out: “Pretend like you know what you’re doing and hope you don’t mess up—although, chances are you will,” she says, “or ask questions and get clarifications. The second option means admitting your limitations, but it provides you the chance to learn and avoid costly mistakes.”

THE LEARNING ISN’T OVER

“Each company has their own way of doing things, so be prepared to adapt to new processes and ways of working through problems.”

TIMING IS OUT OF YOUR CONTROL

“No matter how quickly you complete your tasks, there will be delays that are beyond your control.” The fact that your time—when you’re on the clock—is out of your control can be frustrating, “but understand that all you can do is try your hardest to meet your own deadlines.”

YOU WON’T BE GETTING A “REPORT CARD”

unless you specifically ask, your boss may not be as forthright with feedback as your professors were with your test scores

if you do find an employer who regularly sits down with you to discuss progress, count yourself lucky. It could take months, or even a year, before you receive input or recognition from your boss.”

PROFESSIONALISM IS EVERYTHING

 

 

Asking Questions of Your Interviewer

Source: Fast Company, Apr 2017

  1. HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN WITH THE COMPANY?
  2. WHAT WAS THE LAST BIG ACHIEVEMENT YOU CELEBRATED?
  3. WHAT ACTIVITIES DO YOU OFFER EMPLOYEES?
  4. WHAT WAS YOUR BIGGEST CHALLENGE LAST YEAR, AND WHAT DID YOU LEARN FROM IT?
  5. HOW DO YOU MEASURE SUCCESS, AND OVER WHAT TIME FRAME?
  6. HOW MUCH TIME DO THE OWNERS/LEADERS/FOUNDERS SPEND IN THE OFFICE?
  7. WHAT DO YOUR TEAM MEMBERS DO FOR LUNCH EVERY DAY?

Looking More Confident During a Presentation

Source: HBR, Apr 2017

 

Gesturing as if you were holding a basketball between your hands is an indicator of confidence and control, as if you almost literally have the facts at your fingertips hands. Steve Jobs frequently used this position in his speeches.

When people are nervous, their hands often flit about and fidget. When they’re confident, they are still. One way to accomplish that is to clasp both hands together in a relaxed pyramid. Many business executives employ this gesture, though beware of overuse or pairing it with domineering or arrogant facial expressions. The idea is to show you’re relaxed, not smug

When you stand in this strong and steady position, with your feet about a shoulder width apart, it signals that you feel in control.

This gesture indicates openness and honesty

The opposite movement can be viewed positively too—as a sign of strength, authority and assertiveness.

Super Hubs

Source: Daily Beast, Mar 2017

Professionally, networks are the ultimate competitive advantage. But on a more basic level they are a fundamental precondition for social mobility. Network science mathematically substantiates that in all networks a greater number of connections increases the chances of individual survival. Our fates are determined by the place we occupy within networks, and that place depends on the number and the quality of our connections. “Nodes” with the most connections and the most influence—including human ones—are “superhubs.” Nodes at the fringes are the least connected and suffer the greatest risk of failure.

At elite schools, they receive the best education and, even more important, are introduced to top-tier professional networks. “At Yale,” Vance writes, “networking power is like the air we breathe—so pervasive it’s easy to miss.” These networks allow superhubs to create circumstances favorable to advancing their interests. To optimally scale and capitalize on the system, they continuously build ever more interlinkages.

Choosing Between a Startup and a Tech Giant

Source: Business Insider, Apr 2017

1. ‘Do I want to eventually found my own tech startup?’

“I meet a lot of people who say, ‘Oh eventually I want to start my own company, but I’ll join Google now,’” he says. “My advice there is to always to just go and join a startup. That’s where you’ll actually learn how to start a new company. That’s where you will see a lot of mistakes made, and a lot of successes as well.”

A smaller company might provide you with a broader experience, which you’ll need if you plan to strike out on your own.

2. ‘What drives me?’

“If you are someone who gets a lot of ideas, like you’re showering in the morning and you just have an idea, in a startup, you can have that idea live and serving users by that afternoon,” Otasevic says. “In bigger companies like Google or Facebook, you’ll probably need a month to roll that out.”

So if you’re driven by speed and constant, fast innovations, go for a smaller team. That being said, Otasevic says that your fast changes may go unappreciated by users, if your startup lacks a big reach.

“Everything you release in Google or Facebook will have millions of eyeballs on it,” he says.

In order to figure out where you should take your talents, consider where you’re more motivated by speed or impact.

3. ‘What do I want to learn?’

“People often just settle for conventional wisdom like, ‘Oh, Google has a great engineering team and therefore I will learn a lot there,’” he says. “Yeah, but what do you want to learn? Go deep.”

He says that companies like Google offer excellent learning experience in terms of large-scale systems, while startups can provide more education on building things up from scratch.

4. ‘In what environment do I work best?’

Many tech giants like Google come with great perks and strong company values.

“Google has a great culture, in terms of engineering,” he says. “Intellectual curiosity is a value. That’s been Google’s philosophy in hiring forever. You want to hire people who are extremely curious and passionate about the world’s problems.”

On the other hand, tiny startups can also provide you with a close, fun environment, if you’re on a great team.

“You really feel that people on the team are like your family,” Otasevic says. “You’re pulling in the same direction. Everything that goes good or bad, you’ll get through it together.”

The Bright Future for College Graduates

Source: ZeroHedge, May 2017

Jobs: Supply and Demand

Source: WSJ, Apr 2017