Category Archives: Beauty

Gudetama Cafe (Singapore)

Source: Mashable, Nov 2016
<lots of pictures available at the source>

Gudetama’s name comes from the Japanese word for “no energy” — “gude”. “Tama” comes from “tamago”, Japanese for egg. 

 

People find the little guy’s laidback spirit really relatable. 

Drawings of Gudetama typically show him in a variety of lackadaisical poses: asleep on his egg white bed with with a bacon blanket pulled over him; draped over a bowl of rice exuding an air of indifference; or lounging in a cracked half of his shell — as one does — on a deckchair. 

 

“I love Gudetama  because I can totally relate to feeling apathetic, unmotivated, lazy, pessimistic, and irritable,” says self-confessed diehard fan Delphine Tan, 36. 

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Tolkien’s Book Cover Designs

Source: OpenCulture, Feb 2013

Lord of the Rings

The Two Towers

The Hobbit

The Return of the King

Hallelujah – Susan Boyle

Cut-Outs & Visualizations

Source: Business Insider, Oct 2016
<see source for more cutouts/visualizations>

The Gherkin/London

The White House

Picasso draws with Light

Source: Visual News, May 2012
<see source for more examples>

 

An Einstein Ring

Source: New Scientist, Sep 2016

Lower right-hand corner depicting a blue circle surrounding a yellow dot

A Close-Up

Online Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences – Neil Sloane

Source: Quanta Magazine, Aug 2015

the Online Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences (OEIS), often simply called “Sloane” by its users.

This giant repository, which celebrated its 50th anniversary last year, contains more than a quarter of a million different sequences of numbers that arise in different mathematical contexts, such as the prime numbers (2, 3, 5, 7, 11 … ) or the Fibonacci sequence (0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13 … ). What’s the greatest number of cake slices that can be made with n cuts? Look up sequence A000125 in the OEIS. How many chess positions can be created in n moves? That’s sequence A048987. The number of ways to arrange n circles in a plane, with only two crossing at any given point, is A250001. That sequence just joined the collection a few months ago. So far, only its first four terms are known; if you can figure out the fifth, Sloane will want to hear from you.

A mathematician whose research generates a sequence of numbers can turn to the OEIS to discover other contexts in which the sequence arises and any papers that discuss it. The repository has spawned countless mathematical discoveries and has been cited more than 4,000 times.

Are there other repositories of mathematical information that you wish existed, but don’t yet?

You would like an index to theorems, but it’s hard to imagine how that would work.

We’re trying to get a collaboration going with the Zentralblatt — the German equivalent of Math Reviews’ MathSciNet — about making it possible to search for formulas in the OEIS. Suppose you want the summation of xn over n2 + 3, where the sum goes from one to infinity. It’s very hard to look that up in the OEIS at present.